Activities and Demonstrations

Activity: A Chi-Square Analysis of Taco Bell Sauce Packets

We all can (or should) agree that Taco Bell is the best fast food. When you take a trip to Taco Bell, they’ll inevitably ask if you would like any sauce. The best response: “surprise me.” The payoff? A heaping handful of sauce packets. But, are the flavors randomly distributed, or do they give you …

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Tutorial: Choosing the Correct Test (WISE)

Online tutorial gives students descriptions of research and asks them to select the correct statistic to analyze the data. There are 11 examples in total. Students respond via multiple choice questions and the tutorial provides guidance/feedback throughout. You can access the tutorial here.

Tutorial: Regression (WISE)

Online tutorial that guides students through a research study and data analysis using regression. There are 4 modules total, with the first three being most appropriate for an introductory course. Module 3 is short and could be used as an in-class demonstration. Module 4 is more advanced. During the tutorial students will start with a …

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The Price is Right for Confidence Intervals

Dr. Alexis Grosofsky uses a game from The Price is Right to illustrate confidence intervals (CIs). The game can demonstrate the idea behind how a CI works. Students often find conceptual materials more difficult than computational – a concrete example helps make the concept of a confidence interval more understandable (and memorable). The video clips …

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Activity: Evaluating Statistical Information: Product Selection

This activity gives students practice evaluating statistical information by placing them in the role of a therapist who needs to purchase software for her practice. It also helps show students the value of understanding concepts from research/statistics in contexts other than doing research. This activity should take approximately 15-20 minutes. Students could work individually or …

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Lab Activity: How Does Novelty Impact Food Enjoyment? (t-test for Independent Means/Samples)

In this activity (created by Dr. Eliane Boucher), students will participate in a simplified version of the first study conducted by O’Brien and Smith (2019). In this study, participants were instructed to eat a familiar food (popcorn) in a conventional or an unconventional way (with chopsticks). Participants then rated how enjoyable the food was (note …

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Lab Activity: Caramel Apples and the single sample t-test (SPSS)

This is an activity (created by Dr. Maya G. Sen) that has has students collect data that they analyze (by hand and with SPSS) using a single-sample t-test. They compare the weights of a sample of Caramel Apple Pops to the population mean (i.e., the advertised weight). Materials NeededEnough Caramel Apple Pops for everyone (including …

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Exemplar Study: Can You Accurately Judge Romantic Interest? (Mixed Design)

This study sought to determine whether a third party could discern romantic interest between two strangers. To test this, male and female observers watched video clips of speed-dating situations to determine the individual speed dater’s level of romantic interest toward the speed-dating partner. Participants observed clips of different lengths (10 vs. 30 s), and from …

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Exemplar Study: Must Be Love on the Brain (Within-Subjects/Repeated-Measures Design)

This research focused on the brain functioning of people in love. Participants who rated themselves as being intensely in love, viewed a photo of their beloved, did a distracter task, and then viewed a photo of a neutral acquaintance while researchers took functional magnetic resonance imagery (fMRI). Each participant repeated the procedure six times. When …

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Exemplar Study: Can Using Obscenities Make You More Persuasive? (Multigroup Design)

This multigroup experiment examined the use of an obscenity on thepersuasiveness of a pro-attitudinal message and on perceptions of thecommunicator. Participants watched one of three versions of a video inwhich the speaker advocated lowering tuition at another university. In thefirst version, the speaker used the word “damn” at the beginning of themessage. In the second …

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Exemplar Study: Social Exclusion and Prosocial Behavior (Multigroup Design)

This article indicated that being excluded from social groups leads todecreases in prosocial behavior. Participants received either no feedback on apersonality measure or one of three types of false feedback that indicated afuture full of rewarding relationships, loneliness, or unfortunate accidents.Participants receiving the social exclusion feedback were unwilling tovolunteer for further lab experiments and, after …

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Exemplar Study: Tipping in Restaurants (Two-group Design/Simple Experiment)

To evaluate the effect that a helpful message from a server might have on restaurant tips, the server either wrote a message about an upcoming dinner special on the back of the dining check or left it blank. Dining parties who received a check with the helpful message tipped a higher percentage of the final …

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Link: Spurious Correlation Examples

A website dedicated to creating charts depicting ridiculous correlations (like the one in the picture–clearly we must stop putting Nicolas Cage in films!). You can also pick two variables of your own from a list including topics like: interesting causes of death, sunlight by state, marriage and divorce rates. A great way for students to …

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Practice: Measuring Dependent Variables: Types and Scales of Measurement

This is a brief in-class practice activity (created by Raechel Soicher) to help students review different types of measurement for dependent variables as well as identify scales of measurement. Raechel recommends teaching about the different ways to measure a dependent variable before giving students the opportunity to review using this brief worksheet. She provides definitions …

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Lecture Slides: Calculating the t-test for Independent Means/Samples (Does Eating Spinach Make Your Stronger?)

The goal of this PowerPoint is to work through the step-by-step process of hand calculating a t-test for independent means. The slides start with an explanation of the formula involved and then a sample problem is presented. It is designed for you to have the class solve the problem along with you as you advance …

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Lecture Slides: The Pepsi Challenge (Factorial Design Demonstration)

In this demonstration/activity (with PowerPoint slides) eight student volunteers have the opportunity to provide taste ratings for soda.  Instructors would need to provide cups and soda (usually a 16 oz bottle of each type of soda is enough). Type of soda can vary, but students seem to like the Pepsi vs. Coke dynamic. Another fun …

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Lecture Slides: Arousal and Attraction (Two-Group Design Demonstration)

In this demonstration/activity (with PowerPoint slides) students are randomly assigned to a high or low arousal group based on the last digit of their social security number. Those in high arousal condition believe they will give a short speech on a randomly selected topic. Those in low arousal condition believe they will merely listen a …

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Design & Data: How Do You Know If You Are Truly Helping? (Program Evaluation)

Key Topics and Links to Files Data Analysis Guide Applying Your Skills in the Real World: How Do You Know If You Are Truly Helping? Analyses Included: Single Sample t-test; t-test for Independent Means; Creating a Mean; Descriptive Statistics (Central Tendency)   Dataset Syntax Output BONUS – STUDY 1: How Can We Reduce Underage Drinking? …

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Design & Data: Which Therapy is Best for Treating Eating Disorders? (Mixed Design and Mixed/Repeated-Measures ANOVA)

Key Topics and Links to Files Data Analysis Guide Which Therapy is Best for Treating Eating Disorders? Analyses Included: Mixed ANOVA/Repeated-Measures ANOVA Dataset Syntax Output BONUS: Do Others Help or Hinder Performance? Analyses Included: Mixed ANOVA/Repeated-Measures ANOVA Dataset Syntax Output Design Summary (for the chapter study and the bonus data) Research Question Design Main Analysis …

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Design & Data: Do Pick-up Lines Really Work? (Factorial Design and Two-Way ANOVA)

Key Topics and Links to Files Data Analysis Guide “I Lost My Phone Number, Can I Borrow Yours?” Do Pick-up Lines Really Work? Analyses Included: Two-Way ANOVA Dataset Syntax Output BONUS: Do Tattoos and How You Dress Influence Whether Someone Will Help You?   Analyses Included: Two-Way ANOVA; Descriptive Statistics (Frequencies) Dataset Syntax Output Design …

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